Archive | January, 2016

K.B. Releases New Environmentally-themed Song, Music Video

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K.B. and friends – Music legend Kirkland ‘K.B.’ Bodie is pictured with friends during the making of his newest environmentally-themed song and music video, ‘Das Nasty’. The video that hits airwaves and Youtube January 31 was shot in Nassau, Grand Bahama and Abaco with young volunteers performing with the local superstar.

The voice that became the conscience of the country in songs with catchy lines and upbeat rhythm delivering serious messages is about to hit the airwaves and Youtube again, this time urging us to stop littering and start respecting the beauty of The Bahamas.

Written, produced and performed by multiple award-winning musical artist Kirkland ‘KB’ Bodie, ‘Das Nasty’ was executive produced under the auspices of the popular environmental group Save The Bays.

Its message, says Bodie, is loud and clear – leaving trash on a beach or littering a lawn is just nasty, it’s just nasty.

“We are a tourist nation and I wanted a song that would be catchy enough to stick in people’s heads so it would be a constant reminder – delivered in a lively, friendly way — to keep our country clean,” said Bodie.

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A tourist nation — KB’s latest production ‘Das Nasty’ urging Bahamians to keep the country clean was doubly motivated, first by a conversation with the Minister of Tourism Obie Wilchcombe and then by a report from Disney Cruise Line crew showing trash on beaches and public places.

Early recordings by the top-selling artist like ‘Jus’ Cause She Fat’ and ‘Coo Coo Soup’ made him a performing legend while his work in the past few years has solidified him as a producer with a purpose.

“This idea for ‘Das Nasty’ actually emanated from (Tourism) Minister Obie Wilchcombe,” said the singer. “Because we depend on tourism, he wanted a song to remind people to keep our country clean.” That motivation was reinforced by a video by Disney Cruise Line crewmembers showing dirty beaches and sidewalks, trash in bushes and discarded cans on the ground in public places.

K.B.’s latest chorus carries the message: “When you throw trash on da’ street, you throw trash out ya’ car, das jus’ nasty, das jus’ nasty. When you dirty da Bahamas, boy you know dat ain’t right, das jus’ nasty, oh, dat ain’t nice.”

“I think ‘Das Nasty’ speaks to the common man and will make us remember how important it is to keep our Bahamas clean,” said the singer. “I think it also speaks to that fateful Disney video that said our island was dirty. Here is an opportunity for us to show them we do care. We want to keep our islands clean.”

The Youtube video which was shot in Nassau, Grand Bahama and Abaco features local children who volunteered their time to work with K.B. and create music with a message.

“Those young people and their parents deserve praise not only for all their energy and the hard work they put into performing but for making sure that not a single soda can, foil or fork was left behind after the shoot,” K.B. said, “It was encouraging. The kids cleaned up behind themselves without being asked to do so. I was so proud of them.”

Recent hit songs by K.B. like ‘Hold Dey Feet to Da Fire’ have gone viral on Youtube and social media, becoming part of the vernacular and creating an internet sensation.

“With ‘Das Nasty’, I’m hoping that if it does its job, it will wake everyone up to how important it is to keep the Bahamas clean, green and pristine,” said the singer, “and not just become a catch phrase, but be part of our culture and lifestyle.”

Save The Bays Youth Environment Ambassador Leadership Program Enters 3rd Year, 100% Oversubscribed

The Fortunate Future Ambassadors for the Environment – 80 students ages 12-14 showed up to register for a spot in this year’s Youth Environment Ambassadors program in Grand Bahama, but only 45 could be accommodated. It was the second time that the Save The Bays program that combines academics, practical and hands-on experiences was nearly 100% oversubscribed and this year students get the additional benefit of mentoring by 16 internationally certified facilitators in environmental leadership training, thanks in part to a grant from RBC. It is the second time RBC has partnered with Save The Bays for the popular series.

The Fortunate Future Ambassadors for the Environment – 80 students ages 12-14 showed up to register for a spot in this year’s Youth Environment Ambassadors program in Grand Bahama, but only 45 could be accommodated. It was the second time that the Save The Bays program that combines academics, practical and hands-on experiences was nearly 100% oversubscribed and this year students get the additional benefit of mentoring by 16 internationally certified facilitators in environmental leadership training, thanks in part to a grant from RBC. It is the second time RBC has partnered with Save The Bays for the popular series.

They lined up by the dozens – teenagers eager to sign on, ready to trade chilling out two Saturdays a month for the right to become leaders in environmental stewardship. They were the hopefuls trying to secure one of the sought-after spots in one of the most popular programs in The Bahamas – Youth Environmental Ambassadors (YEA).

 

Now entering its third year, the popular semi-monthly training that runs from mid-January to the end of May is sponsored by Save The Bays, the fast-growing environmental organization with nearly 20,000 Facebook friends. YEA also receives grant support from RBC for the training of facilitators through an international award-winning program.

 

Sessions start at the Grand Bahama YMCA before participants head to hand-on experiences, taking to the water to study coral reefs, lakes or wetlands or going on guided field trips ranging from eco-tourism exploration to insights into industrial plants, learning what environmental risks are at stake and what protection measures are undertaken to guard against potential damage.

 

The YEA program is in such demand that Save The Bays is trying to find ways to expand. For the second time, twice as many hopefuls showed up to sign up as could be accommodated and those 12-14-year-olds trying to get in competed by answering questions on climate change and other environment-related topics.

 

“The young people in Grand Bahama have been so enthusiastic,” said Save The Bays Chairman Joseph Darville. “Like last year, we had 80 young men and women show up for 45 spots. The fact that these young people care so much and are competing for a spot in the program is encouraging because it shows that we are making real headway with educating our own people about how important the environment is and what role they can play in environmental stewardship.”

 

Thanks to $5,000 grants from RBC for the past two years, the global financial institution committed to saving the world’s water and providing clean drinking water, YEA has been able to connect with the internationally acclaimed Center for Creative Leadership, named by Financial Times Top Five Worldwide in Executive Education. Sixteen Bahamians who graduated from the Center’s leadership program and are now internationally certified will serve as facilitators for participants.

“Additionally, in preparation for the critical issue of climate change, a number of our team members not only received certified leadership training in climate change reality under former Vice President Al Gore, but they also were part of Waterkeeper Alliance/Save The Bays  delegates to the recent climate change summit in Paris (COP21 Paris).  Thus, not only is our team immensely qualified to expertly lead our youth forward at this critical juncture on our planet, but it is more than admirably capable to assist in working with national leaders in all matters related to climatic changes,” said Darville, who also attended the Paris conference.

 

“These are critical times in the life of this nation and its people, especially the young. They will truly be out environmental ambassadors carrying the important work and message forward and this program assists them in becoming involved in all the leadership aspects for personal development as well as for the fortification of their country.”

 

This year’s series opened January 16 with West End Ecology Tours and a presentation by its owners, Keith and Linda Cooper.

 

“Keith Cooper’s spirit of passion, inspiration and dedication to our precious environment of amazing abundance cannot but be infinitely infectious,” said Darville. “When he was showing the video of locals and tourists connecting with nature through snorkeling, feeding the sting rays and exploring reefs and wrecks off the coast of West End, the students were spellbound. At the end of our session, we saw smiles and shyness evaporating, new friendships forming and a budding realization that this is no ordinary program.  We grow by learning about and exploring our environment and when you get to know something, you love it.”

The YEA program is one of many initiatives of Save The Bays, the organization that has been vocal in environmental advocacy and education as well as filing legal action to ensure accountability in matters related to unregulated or harmful development. Save The Bays has been part of a growing movement urging Freedom of Information legislation and its calls for open government are reaching a growing audience.

Patrick Vedrine, Eight Mile Rock High student, left and Lauren Bethel, Tabernacle Baptist Academy, tackle questions related to the role of wetlands during the first session of the 2016 Youth Environment Ambassadors program, a Save The Bays initiative.

Patrick Vedrine, Eight Mile Rock High student, left and Lauren Bethel, Tabernacle Baptist Academy, tackle questions related to the role of wetlands during the first session of the 2016 Youth Environment Ambassadors program, a Save The Bays initiative.

 

She’s got the answer—This eager student is all eyes and hand raised to answer a question during the opening session of the 2016 Save The Bays initiative Youth Environment Ambassadors. She was one of the fortunate ones who got into the program that was once again 100% oversubscribed with 80+ students applying for 45 slots. Class sessions start at the YMCA in Grand Bahama before moving into the field for hands-on experiences and tours.

She’s got the answer—This eager student is all eyes and hand raised to answer a question during the opening session of the 2016 Save The Bays initiative Youth Environment Ambassadors. She was one of the fortunate ones who got into the program that was once again 100% oversubscribed with 80+ students applying for 45 slots. Class sessions start at the YMCA in Grand Bahama before moving into the field for hands-on experiences and tours.

 

Enthusiasm – 16 Bahamians who graduated from an internationally acclaimed leadership course, made possible in part by a grant from RBC, serve as facilitators in the popular Save The Bays Youth Environment Ambassadors program in Grand Bahama.

Enthusiasm – 16 Bahamians who graduated from an internationally acclaimed leadership course, made possible in part by a grant from RBC, serve as facilitators in the popular Save The Bays Youth Environment Ambassadors program in Grand Bahama.

 

Passion – West End Eco Tours owner Keith Cooper led students on a visual and verbal tour of the intricate eco-system of their own island of Grand Bahama during the opening session of the semi-monthly four month Save The Bays program Youth Environment Ambassadors. The program combines environmental issues with leadership training, preparing participants for future roles as stewards and protectors of the Bahamian environment.

Passion – West End Eco Tours owner Keith Cooper led students on a visual and verbal tour of the intricate eco-system of their own island of Grand Bahama during the opening session of the semi-monthly four month Save The Bays program Youth Environment Ambassadors. The program combines environmental issues with leadership training, preparing participants for future roles as stewards and protectors of the Bahamian environment.